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Search Results 50 to 99 of about 844 (some duplicates have been removed)
built environment." one key issue: how to protect the new york subway system which experienced the worst damage in it's 108 year history. many stations remain submerged under several feet of water even as limited operations are expected to resume tomorrow. but infrastructure renovations are not always a clear fix. mayor michael bloomberg, who has taken a number of steps to make new york a greener city, has not yet proposed a major infrastructure change that might deal with rising water levels, for example. but he warned again today that citizens and policymakers need to take climate change predictions seriously. >> it's not the sort of thing that you can ever say for sure but the consequences of making a mistake in either direction are pretty severe and i think what we have to do is learn from this and protect our infrastructure to the extent possible. the bottom line is we've lost some people, we have to make sure we help their families and pray for them. we have to at the same time ensure that we go forward here and keep the city going. >> suarez: part of the growing problem: new york'
we think of future operating environment will be? so it's about learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward. so we have to do several things. we just rolled out brand-new documents for the first time the army has done an extensive rollout of doctrine and recent memory. we published the initial high-level documents of our doctrine and the sub elements over the next six or eight months and represent represents represent some of the lessons we learned in how we think they will apply in the future. this is key as we start to look to the future, making sure we are dazed and what we believe is the way forward and we do that by writing a doctrine. we have to look at operations in the type of operations and what are the best ways train our forces for the future. one of the more important things is how do we develop leaders? we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt our leader development program so what i mean by this, this is about adapting leaders from the time
michael bloomberg endorsed president obama citing his support for the environment. just days before the election, bloomberg announced his decision in an op-ed entitled, "a vote for president, a vote for a president to lead on climate change the." riding -change." he compared the records of obama and mitt romney but he wrote -- bloomberg's endorsement is particularly striking because much of the news media has barely mentioned climate change, even in the lead up or aftermath of the superstorm. there were also no questions addressed to the presidential candidates on climate change in the course of the three presidential debates. also, mayor bloomberg was a republican who turned independent. one of the news outlets that has broken the silence on climate change is the magazine "bloomberg businessweek." the cover story is called, "it's global warming, stupid." to talk more about the issue, we areoined by the author, paul barrett, assistant managing editor at bloomberg businessweek. it is great to see. lay out this article, "it's global warming, stupid." >> good morning. what we've tried
they apply to what we think the future operating environment with the. so with learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward. so we have to update several things. we just rolled out a brand-new doctrine. the first time the army has been an extensive rollout of doctrine in recent memory. we have published the additional high level documents of our doctrine. we will start to publish the sub elements of this over the next six or eight months and represent some the lessons we've learned how we figure we'll apply to the future. and this is key as we start to look for the future as making sure we are based in what we believe is a way forward and we do that by riding doctrine. we have to look at operations, the type of operations, what are the best way to train our forces for the future, what are more important thing is how do we develop leaders. we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt a related development programs. what i mean by this, this is about adapting programs
think the future operating environment will be? so it's about learning from the past, it's about applying the right lessons, but it's about how does it apply to the future operating environment as we go forward? so we have to update several things. we just rolled out brand new doctrine. the first time the army has done an extensive doctrine in recent memory. and we have published the initial high level documents of our doctrine, we'll start to publish the subelements of this over the next six, eight months. it represents some of the lesson we learn and how we think it will apply to the future. this is key as we start to look to the future making sure we are based in what we believe is the way forward and we do that by writing doctrine. we have to look at operations, type of operations. what are the best way to train our forces for the future? one of the more important thing is how do we develop leaders? we believe one of the most important things we have to do is adapt our leader development programs. what i mean by this, about adapting leader development programs from the time y
in international environments to help promote humanitarian missions. fleet week got involved with a humanitarian mission back in october in the earthquake in van, turkey. there's a heavy kurdish in san francisco and the ... better recover from their event and how to better prepare in the future from the katz traufk event that had taken place would not occur. we got a phone call at the fleet week association to ask if we could help bring together some resources and leet a fact-finding mission and we did that. one of our panelists is up here, second from your left, rob dudgeon, he's with the department of emergency management and he's the director of emergency services. rob's organization has been instrumental in creating the program that we have from back in 2010 all the way through to today and i know in the future we're already talking about putting together a hot wash of everything we've learned through 2012's fleet week. so rob is going to talk about the van, turkey mission. from turkey we have rear admiral guereva he has more than 14 years sea-going experience serving across various frig
transportation fund for clean air revenues support. these are typically lead by the department of environment. one project that is flagged on your hand out for delivery issues is being led by the air district. this is the regional bike share project. i won't cover this. but it's a 12 to 24-month pilot program being done in the south bay select locations on the peninsula to test out bike sharing. i think the air district is experiencing the challenges we face with multiple sponsors. it's not going as fast as we can. we have dug into it a little bit. we are worried about cost controls for staff support cost and can report that the sfmta staff has been diligent in locating space. i think we are well positioned to get our bike sharing part of project out quickly. pedestrian projects, these are ones that we will have locations in each district. we have a larger list that i asked to be determined locations on curb ramps, what you see here, this is last year's allocation at 175 curb ramps. these have an independent of coordination with other projects. one of actions is approving dpw to kirkham. they
2008 and she has been in congress for jobs and our environment and she been such a great champion of public transportation that even cal train named a loco motor after jackie spear. please welcome congress woman jackie spear. >> thank you mr. mayor. thank you secretary lahood. thank you to the incredible leadership, senator feinstein, nancy pelosi and mayor lee and the board of supervisors to chairman nol an from the sfmta. i am on pins and needles. do we have anything else to report? it's still at the same point we think they're in commercials. i am reminded from the song from "top gun" "take my breath away" and $942 million takes my breath away and i think to mayor lee for that amount i think we should get a leather flight jacket to thank mr. lahood for the great gift to our great city. the new money that is going to be used here is going to create 1,000 new jobs before the end of the year with many more jobs to come after that. that is something to applaud. thank you again secretary lahood for that. this is one point 7 miles very similar to the length of the golden ga
environment. >> i enjoy this base and the history behind it. the diversity that exists in such an urban city, the concrete, the streets, cars, we have this oasis of a natural environment. it reminds us of what san francisco initially was. >> this is a section for dogs and plenty of parking. transit is available to get you there easily. and the part is ada -- park is ada accessible. there is also a natural lake. this is your chance to stroll and let the kids run free. it also has many birds to watch. it is the place to find some solitude from the city and appreciate what you share with a wonderful breath of fresh air. , an experienced this park and enjoy the peoples, picnics, and sunshine. this is a lovely place to take a stroll with your loved one hand in hand. located in the middle of pacific heights on top of a hill, lafayette park offers a great square a of a peaceful beauty. large trees border greenery. it features tables and benches, a playground, restaurants, and tennis courts. there are plenty of areas for football, frisbee, and picnics. it is very much a couple's part and there are
and transit for her customers and for your delicious food and welcoming environment and being a role model for other small businesses in the community and summer peterson thank you for everything that you do and great success to you. >> thank you. it's amazing. i never think about what i do in that way really. it just comes natural. we always say we can't have a strong business without a strong community and that's the only way i kind of see t i wanted to say thank you. we're only six months old but we do appreciate the recognition so thank you very much. it is really important to us. but i did want to say we are thrilled we are in a position already known as we are that we can give back to our community by yes serving amazing food and a fun environment that we can incorporate the neighborhood. aside from hosting the nonprofit bowling days our restaurant offers specific menu items and a dollar from each item dollars to youth supporting projects and we rotate that out monthly to reach as many organizations as possible. some of the organizations in the district of root division and t
to video games. the last point i would like to make is that the environment is really changing rapidly. 10 years ago, if we had sat down and talk about seniors and technology, a lot of people would have wondered why seniors would want to use computers, but that has shifted. over the next few years, as all of us move toward being seniors, we will not be wanting technology. we will be demanding it. the field is going to change, and more and more people are going to be here. so the ability to make technology accessible is there. those of us charged with doing this have a really important role. we have to be able to provide the tools for the technology in ways that the people can hear. i am happy to be your speaking with you because i think this is an incredibly important topic. this afternoon, there is a workshop on addressing multiple barriers for accessing technology, and it will be a brainstorming session where someone from my office and a couple of other people will be leading a discussion of what issues people run into and how you deal with them. i think it is a really important topic an
. they worked at a much closer environment and they cannot be perceived as a snitch. or that they are working with the police department. they are there to, down, emotionally, the anchor. what they do then, we have a shooting war homicide. and they go to the hospital to be with the families. any talk of retaliation -- they will work with our social workers at the hospital. and whether the retaliation must go next. to saturate and prevent and interrupt any violence that may occur. this is a component or peace that has been building. i polled the captains of payview, mission, ingleside and the northern district. these are the most affected by gang violence. they said they appreciated what the crn did what they want to see them more. they need to fill that communication. it also comes down to training and trust, to be able to have them talk to officers. they would address the officers, they had arrested some of them, when there were actually under. they will help the police and the community. under his guidance we are the most active community. of anyone in this country and any department. he pu
in environmental factors this is something that involves the city environment. and it's something that dirties the environment and we're involved in keeping a clean area in the school and city. while our impact isn't great we do give people an outlet to help their community rather than hurt it and we do teach them what kind of real impact it does have, both monetarily and to people and their quality of life. >> thank you. at this time i will open public comment on item no. 36789 seeing none, public comment is now closed. [ gavel ] made chair? >> yes i'm just looking right now the applicant is under 18 years old and in the charter all members of boards and commissions must be of legal voting age unless the authorizing legislation sets a position for someone under 18. so i'm checking that right now before you take a vote on it. >> okay. then if we may, if we could -- i will take comments first, but maybe we can continue this item to a later portion of the meeting. i would want to find a way to support this applicant, because i know we have a lot of young people engaged in this activity and i
creates a welcoming environment for everybody. there is no cultural barrier to entry. >> the demographic of people who come will match the demographic of the reader. it is very simple. if we want more people of color, you book more people of color. you want more women, your book more women. kind of like that. it gets mixed up a little bit. in general, we kind of have a core group of people who come every month. their ages and very. we definitely have some folks who are straight. >> the loyal audience has allowed michelle to take more chances with the monthly lineup. established authors bring in an older audience. younker authors bring in their friends from the community who might be bringing in an older author. >> raider has provided a stage for more than 400 writers. it ranges from fiction to academics stories to academic stories this service the underground of queer fell, history, or culture. >> and there are so many different literary circles in san francisco. i have been programming this reading series for nine years. and i still have a huge list on my computer of people i need to ca
straight about 10 years ago. -- 7th street about 10 years ago. the environment is huge. it is stronger than willpower. surrounding yourself with artists, being in a culture where artists are driving, and where a huge amount of them is a healthy environment. >> you are making it safer. push, push. that is better. when i start thinking, i see it actually -- sometimes, i do not see it, but when i do, it is usually from the inside out. it is like watching something being spawned. you go in, and you begin to work, excavate, play with the dancers, and then things began to emerge. you may have a plan that this is what i want to create. here are the ideas i want to play with, but then, you go into the room, and there maybe some fertile ideas that are becoming manifest that are more interesting than the idea you had initially set out to plan. so there has to be this openness for spontaneity. also, a sense that regardless of the deadline, that you have tons of time so the you can keep your creativity alive and not cut it off and just go into old habits. it is a lot like listening. really listening to
, about hoour environment, how to improve life for more people, how to make an expensive city more affordable to more people, how to utilize the strengths of the city as a great tourist city. how we can get more folks to come and experience the wonders of the city. maybe they will make their stake here. these panel members have decided to make their stake here. they risked reputation, may be small amounts of money. if they had a lot of money, they may not have had to start this. they have also done it for the right reasons. they want to experience the city in a different way, but one that is in the tradition of san francisco and is reflective of mine, welcoming more people to share in the economy. hopefully the right reasons will create more jobs and get more entrepreneurs involved. i have often said this can be the city for the 100%. everybody can have a chance to fulfill their dreams and make sure they can have a stable income for themselves and their families. i think we are on the verge of discussing things that would invite other members of our city family, department heads, t
slashed 25% and brutal in any environment and especially when other budgets hasn't been slashed as much, and understanding it might upset the apple cart so to speak, but i don't think we can be afraid of that in g we have to innovate. to some degree and maybe your department faces a challenge and labeled innovation capital of the world, however you want to label it and in the center of technology globally and i think we are expected to innovate. so what are some of the things that have to happen? what environments do you have to see -- let's say it's a centralization issue. what are issues that have to take place to have that dialogue happening? to me as i read through the report and i don't know about you president chiu, there seems to be an issue here. and progress is being made and that is great but is it fast enough? when i tell people i am on lotus notes for email it's a round laughter all along and what needs to take place. >> let me say two things about the conversation and let me put it out there how i perceive the comments and the reports and supervisor your comments. number
there are people at risk of foreclosure. this makes a rich environment for people to commit fraud and scams. they are preying on people that have property or equity in the property so they can take the money in the property. they have people desperate in need of relief from mortgages. there's a lot of activity in san francisco. what this enables our office to do is create a specialized unit. to continue to create a specialized unit and build on expertise our office has previously developed. many of you may have heard recently we have had two very noteworthy cases, one was a case involving a 2.2 million fraud scheme where several suspects had filed false deeds in attempt to steal property that was already paid for, no mortgages. and later attempted to go get money loans off the property they had stole on paper. successfully prosecuted and individuals facing upwards of 20 and -- 15 years and up. we've had another scam related to loan modification scams, targeting the hispanic community. where an individual had been promising foreclosure relief and had been taking people's money under the impr
on there. it's a casual environment compared to some of the clubos polk street and having lived in the area i really like the environment of it. i think it's a great use of it, and i think it really does clean up a lot of what is going on down there, and i think he's doing the neighborhood a great service by toning it down because if you ever stepped there on a friday or saturday night it's scary and that's a nice quiet place and it does feel like your living room and i feel he's using it like it's proposed. you can try the wine before you buy a bottle and you don't have to worry about getting run over in the street so i am in favor of it. >> thank you. >> hi there. i am -- [inaudible]. i am a semi new resident of san francisco. let's been almost a year now but since i of living here on moving one of the first places i met a friend after work was at the poor house, and it was intimidating coming into the big city but i found this place it's very comfortable. i felt -- i mean -- i frequent there about twice a month and meet up with girlfriends and me and my friends feel comfortable ther
security and begin to undo the damage that our current water system does to the environment. the plan would then be brought back to the voters in 2016 for their aprafl or disapproval so it's placing the city on a trajectory we're not currently on. we don't recycle any water, we've abandoned most ground water since hetch hetchy became available and we've done real damage to the tuolome river and we begin it's time to get in line with the city's values. it's a plan the voters ultimately get to approve. >> i disagree. i think proposition f is about one thing and one thing only, about forcing the city to spend $8 million dollars to conduct a plan that would require us to drain hetch hetchy reservoir at a cost of anywhere between 3 and 10 billion dollars that gets translated to our rate payers at anywhere between $2,000 and $2700 per year per rate payer. this is a proposal largely hoisted upon san franciscoans by outsiders. not one san francisco organization supports this measure. every group from san francisco tomorrow to the republican party across the political spectrum opposes us
situations where that might have been the case, but that is certainly not the environment in the house. it does have professionals such as myself that do have work in the city. we have to go back and forth from marin and from the east bay. that i know in my situation, i also have a car, which is a point i want to address to you in a moment. to the extent the assumption it's transitory housing, that is slipper not my experience. i think it certainly going in alignment with the way that manufacture of us work as professionals in. i also work in a co-working space and environment. in terms of car parking, there is a safety issue i would like to address with you. i do own a car and it's parked on the street and as you know in that neighborhood it's a very high-cycling traffic neighborhood. you have done an excellent job in the city of marking the roads. i am also a cyclist and i greatly appreciate that. i light up my cycles and many cyclists light up their cycles, but for drivers to seek parking such as myself it's a challenging thing do so the aspect of having additional parking in the n
of the room. it's basically used in hall of the hakkasans and that environment but i don't think it's a destination place for people to come as a club really. it's really to add environment to the people that are there, the guests that are there. >> just because when you do a new year's eve party and crank it up. >> if they can hear it over in union square i would be surprised. i spent many years at the st. francis hotel. i know what it gets like. >> any other comments? >> i thought kearney street could use more nightlife and everything closes after that and there are a couple of businesses there and it's exciting that you're coming in and bringing vitality to street life -- not street life but walking in and out of your doors. >> thank you commissioner. we're pretty excited about that too and we will be in las vegas and los angeles after that as well. las vegas is a 70,000 square foot club. that is quite different. >> thank you. any questions from the public? yes. >> well good evening commissioners. i am also a long time 22 year resident and i want to discuss and also presen
environment in iraq and assure more japanese firms can do business in the country. the president met iraq's prime minister through his first visit to the country and told the minister japanese companies are concerned about the risks of doing business in iraq. they include the sudden cancellation of contract. he asked iraq to promote a more business friendly environment. he stressed that the company will help iraq draft a legal framework to protect the rights of investors. next year will mark the tenth anniversary of the start of the iraq war. violence still rocks the country but iraq is becoming a major oil producer once again. the country's economic growth is expected to top 12% this year. japan self defense forces and u.s. military will hold their training exercise in waters off okinawa prefecture. they were to practice a land mag nufr, but it has forced military plan tires take a less direct approach. the drill is part of a large scale exercise that starts next week. commanders want to enhance the defense of southwestern islands. in italy they plan to hold a drill on an uninhabited isl
the big step one city took to help the environment. brandon reports that more and more communities are now taking up the cause. >> they stuff our landfills, tangle in our trees, and they kill sea birds and mammals. plastic bags -- ever year, we use and throw away millions of them. >> plastic bags are a huge litter problem throughout the world. >> we interviewed mr. bloomenfeld back in 2007 when san francisco became the first city in the u.s. to ban plastic bags. large stores were not allowed to offer them to customers. the ban was a success. so the city then voted to expand it to every store in town. now communities all across the country are hopping on the "ban" wagon. the day after rye, new york, passed its law against plastic bags, teens were handing out green alternatives. >> there are no more plastic bags going to be offered in stores, so we're helping people out by giving them reusable bags. >> reusable bags are considered the best alternative... >> wonderful. >> ...because even paper bags are bad for the environment. although they can be recycled, they still use up natural resources
, given all of this, how do you want to invest in this environment? >> pick carefully. i think you needy verseification in these kind of environment. don't have all of anything. that means don't sell all of your bonds, even though rates are low. be careful of your duration. on the equities side, if you've enjoyed some of the profits so far this year, maybe take a little off the table. if you're still waiting an waiting, dollar cost average in, i think you need to have some exposure in various categories. >> good insight, as always. thanks very much. >> thank you. up next on "the wall street journal" report, the banker whose letter of resignation made the editorial page of t"the new york times." and later, small businesses employ awe half o of all americans. what this year's political climate means for the balance sheets for those businesses. as we take a break, take a look at how the stock market ended the week. in america today we're running to compete on the global stage. what we need are people prepared for the careers of our new economy. by 2025, we could have 20 million jobs without
and express how they were affected by it in a safe environment and i believe it changes the lives of the students and changes of lives of usace artists. it's my hope in the year to become a second space like the strand will afford the students and the community to have gold work and engages the community the same way we were able to engage those students. i believe it will be a place where audience members will say their souls were fed from the stage and i urge the commission to share in this hope and enrich the life of the community so that we have grow and thrive together. >> good afternoon commissioners. i am eddy raymond and the vice president of ist local 16 in san francisco. i was an employee for act when i came into the union office. act employees hundreds of local 16 members over the course of one season. we represent the stage staff, and the permanent stage staff and the load for the theater as well as the scene shop and prop shop with act. we see this as building new audiences and keep theater in the bay area alive and vital and relative to its community. we see th
strength, which is new york's coastal environment, that's what made new york new york, right? new york harbor, hudson river, to the erie canal, and you were out west. that was new york. what made manhattan manhattan was the underground infrastructure. that engineering marvel. once you now say, well, that can flood, and you can't even find a way to pump out the water, you take the greatest asset and you make it a liability. and it's a frightening premise to deal with, you know? i think that's one of the reasons why denial is so much easier. because once you say, yes, extreme weather is here to say, we have to redesign this environment environment, well that's a big undertaking and it's threatening to many. i think that's where we are. >> can new york city escape the sort of national flurosis? it's a fight on the national level. out of necessity, can new york state and new york city lead on this issue because we have to, even if the rest of the country isn't ready to arrive at any consensus and make any big national decisions? >> we're going to try. you know, what we practice in new york
, shape the environment after you get out? and i think that's what all of this talk about 2014 in afghanistan is, to focus the minds of afghan leaders. we are not going to be around. and i actually think iraq has gone better than i expected. so, who knows. afghanistan might too. i'm actually though in the long run, more pessimistic about afghanistan than i am about iraq. >> start by why do you think iraq has gone better than expected and then michael will talk about where you think there's gaps in this path's approach to t. >> i thought that iraq would unravel after the americans left. in fact, aid series on my blog called "iraq, the unraveling." it hasn't. rather it has sort of come to a stalemate it is not falling apart but not making any political progress it is just sort of sitting there, not a great situation but actually better than i personally expected when i last took a long look at iraq. what people forget in this country though is iraq, even right now, is still more violent than afghanistan is. >> well, i actually think the search was considerable success in a milita
Search Results 50 to 99 of about 844 (some duplicates have been removed)